New Tadano HK truck cranes

By Christian Shelton17 March 2021

The Tadano HK 4.070-1 (left) and HK 4.050-1 have been designed to fulfil the latest emissions regulations, for both the chassis and the cranes

Crane manufacturer Tadano has launched a pair of truck mounted cranes, the 50 tonne capacity HK 4.050-1 and the 70 tonne capacity HK 4.070-1.

Built in Germany the HK 4.050-1 is 11.11 metres long and 2.55 metres wide, while the HK 4.070-1 is 11.80 metres long and 2.55 metres wide. Both cranes are less than 4 metres in height and available on Volvo and Scania chassis. The 4.050-1 can also be installed on Mercedes and MAN chassis.

The HK 4.050-1 has a 35.2 metre telescopic boom. With the jib, the reach increases to 44.2 metres. Capacity is 7.6 tonnes at a radius of 7 metres and 4.2 tonnes at a radius of 20 metres.

The HK 4.050-1 (left) has a 35.2 metre boom. The HK 4.070-1 has a 41 metre main boom

The HK 4.070-1 has a 41 metre main boom. With a jib, the maximum length is 56.8 metres. The HK 4.070-1 lifts up to 55.6 tonnes at a radius of 3 metres with a counterweight of 10.1 tonnes. At a radius of 8 metres, it can lift 19.2 tonnes.

Tadano said it designed the new four-axle truck mounted cranes with a focus on manoeuvrability. Both cranes have steered front and trailing axles. The second and third axles are closer to the centre of the vehicle than standard axle configurations, providing a 2 metre smaller turning radius than the preceding models.

According to Tadano the two rigid mechanical axles (axles two and three) combined with air suspension for the three rear axles provide the cranes with good tractive force on the road and stability during travel.

Both truck cranes come with H-style outriggers. These are the only Tadano truck cranes to do so. Tadano said the H-style outriggers require less space compared to swing-out ones and enable the chassis to be lifted higher. The outriggers on both models can also be positioned in an asymmetrical configuration. When being used like this the crane’s AML crane control software automatically determines its maximum lifting capacity.

The HK 4.050-1 has a Cummins engine in its upper works for crane operation

“We decided to develop the new series fulfilling all the latest emissions regulations, for both the chassis and the cranes,” said Michael Klein, product marketing manager, who is overseeing the cranes’ launch, “so they come with EU Stage V emission standard engines with an exhaust gas treatment system.”

The engines used in the superstructure are manufactured by Mercedes (HK 4.070-1) and Cummins (HK 4.050-1) and deliver 129 kW (175 PS) in the HK 4.070-1 and 101 kW (137 PS) in the HK 4.050-1. The superstructure and carrier engines on the HK 4.070-1 can be fuelled from the same side.

Both cranes can be set up with a 32 tonne configuration which does not require any additional road permits for travel in many European countries. The HK 4.050-1 can carry 4.5 tonnes of counterweight while staying within axle load requirements. Even with the total 8.5 tonnes of counterweight it remains under 12 tonnes of axle load.

The HK 4.070-1 can carry 10.1 tonnes of counterweight, although both models can be supplied with an additional trailer for transporting the maximum counterweight. Using the trailer would mean, for example, that the HK 4.070-1 can then remain under a vehicle combination weight of 41.8 tonnes while carrying an additional 7.1 tonnes of counterweight on the trailer.

The cranes also have a storage compartment in the body frame for tools and accessories.

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